Seminars

VALIDATE will host a seminar series each University term; with information about our seminars here. Each seminar consists of an Investigator and an Associate VALIDATE member discussing a topic in their field that they believe will have cross-pathogen interest for VALIDATE members. All our seminars are live-streamed so that you can benefit from our speakers wherever you're based in the world.

 

February 2019 Seminar:

 

VALIDATE seminar - Developing a better vaccine against TB

To watch the seminar (which is accessible to members and non-members) click here.

TB kills more people than any other infectious disease. The efficacy of the only available vaccine, BCG, is highly variable and lowest in high burden settings. The McShane group is developing novel TB vaccine candidates by identifying novel antigenic targets and exploring novel routes of immunization.

TB vaccine development is challenging given the lack of defined immunological correlates of protection. Class II restricted T cells are critical for protective immunity but may not be sufficient. Dr Tanner will provide an update on functional mycobacterial growth inhibition assays and on a role for antibodies in protective immunity.

This seminar will be livestreamed via VALIDATE's Weblearn pages and will be open-access and available to non-members. To watch the seminar click here (the video will appear in Replay when the seminar starts; just refresh your browser regularly so that it pops up). A recording of the seminar will also be available on our website.

Live viewers will be able to ask questions via Twitter by posting to #VALIDATEevents.

 

Previous seminars

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Andrea Zelmer - Helen Fletcher

 

“Correlates of risk of TB disease and their back-translation into animal models”

Drs Andrea Zelmer & Helen Fletcher, LSHTM

Date: Wed 6 December 2017 at 12.30 pm (UK time)

Venue: LSHTM Lucas room LG81, or to view online click here (talk will open at 1230)

Immune correlates of risk of TB disease have recently been identified in human clinical trials.  These correlates indicate that, years before TB disease develops, there is alteration in the host-immune environment which is associated with risk of TB disease. Perhaps these alterations render the immune environment permissive to mycobacterial infection or increased growth, or perhaps they reduce the efficacy of the BCG vaccine?  Back translation of immune correlates of risk into animal models will enable us to address these questions and model the immune response of those individuals at greatest risk of TB disease.

Non LSHTM viewers will be able to ask questions via Twitter by posting to @NetworkValidate

Seminar Archive

Watch previous seminars in our archive:

 

"Developing a better vaccine against TB"

Prof Helen McShane & Dr Rachel Tanner, University of Oxford

15 Feb 2019

 

“Correlates of risk of TB disease and their back-translation into animal models”

Drs Andrea Zelmer & Helen Fletcher, LSHTM

6 December 2017

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